Tag Archives: installing

Installation Overview

You will get a complete manual with every order, recently updated. You can download our instruction manual through the links below for a preview or to prepare for your delivery.

You can also view the additional articles, links or videos on our how to page. Please note, not all pages or options apply to everyone.

There is quite a bit of information contained in this manual that it CRITICAL to be understood. These structures are more complex to assemble than your typical Swedish Furniture.

The pages are in the order they should be read.
#1-2 are very important notes about installation and the rest of the manual.
#3 & #7 are options, you have one or the other
#6, 8, and 10 your building may or may not have depending on options you choose
1. START HERE
2. Requirements Before You Build
3. Anchoring – Base Brackets
3. Anchoring – Anchor Posts
4. ridge & hoops
5. Purlins & Windbraces
6. (optional) Cross Ties
7. Covering-Plastic Roof
7. Covering-Tarp Roof
8. (optional) Roll up Side Walls
9. Wirelock & Side Wall Cover Fasteners
10. (optional) Inflator Fan
11. End Wall Covering, Framing and End Ideas
12. Door ideas and options

click here to download a step by step breakdown of the process in PDF format. TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MANUAL ABOVE, NOT AS A STAND ALONE RESOURCE.

general inside

You can download our Hanley Assembly installation overview

You can download our movable structure information package 

You can download information for installing our Accordian door or Roll up door assembly

One of the most common questions we get asked is regarding installation of our structures. We have tried to create a simple yet effective solution for your applications, and recently have revamped our installation guide with more pictures, a glossary and more detailed instructions about everything to empower our customer more. You can find that above. (SEE ABOVE 1-14)

 We are in the process of creating more videos, and you can see our current how tos here. These structures are supplied as kits, intended for our customer to be able to install themselves. We are available for whatever questions you may have.
Many of our customers are also familiar with a contractor or someone in their area they trust to install their structure, and we are happy to work with them to create an understanding so the customers are not required to be educators as well.
Although we used to install, the weather has become far too unpredictable and we simply do not have the man power to be able to get the structures out in a timely manner as well as install. Anyone who would be worth recommending is booking at least 3 months out.
We have confidence that you will be able to install these structures yourselves with a small team of people and are currently working on a small database of customers in various areas that are willing to coach or give advice for a small fee to new customers who are looking for guidance.
Thank you for your inquiry, but no, we do not install, or know anyone yet that could help.
ORIENTATION & LOCATION

It is generally accepted that a north/south facing building picks up the sunlight better and an east/west building ventilates easier. Therefore, unless you are into cut flowers or a similar high production item east/west is preferred. “Preferred” is the operative word. There are a number of other things that come into play and warrant consideration…. READ MORE

INSTALLATION BY MULTI SHELTERS

Multi Shelter Solutions does not have a crew that goes around to various sites. The area we supply buildings to is simply too large to cover with an installation crew…. READ MORE

DRAWINGS AND PERMITS

To have a full set of drawings for each structure variation would be impossible. We are slowly working through the more popular models and having an engineer review them for conformity to the building code. If your building inspector requires a specific set of drawings for your application, there will be a small fee charged…. READ MORE

WEATHER CAUTIONS

These buildings are not industrial grade shelters and, as such, some caution must be exercised under some winter storm conditions…. READ MORE

Covering Ends – Plastic & Tarp

Please refer to the Ends page in the assembly guide as well

When you are covering the ends of the structure, there are some similarities and some fundamental differences when you are covering with plastic or with tarp.

The aluminum wirelock channel must be installed on the top side of the hoop before you start the cover. The framing must also be in place before you are putting on the cover.

Your cover will be a rectangle and you must double check if the two ends were supplied as one piece or not.

  • You start at the base of one side and go continuously over the peak so that there is not an edge at the peak.
  • The cover gets fastened, temporarily, at the base first on either side of the door and then pull out to the corners.

If there is ANY wind, do into the wind side first.

  • Please remember that whenever you have wrinkles or folds, you will pull 90 degrees to the wrinkle.

Excess on the end covers will only get trimmed off after the roof cover is on as well.

If you are covering the end with plastic

  • you would go with the extra of your rectangle and fasten it temporarily to the back side of your framing.
  • At the very most, at this stage you will put part of a wire insert on either side of the peak.
  • When the cover is sitting smooth, you can put some strapping on the vertical framing to hole the cover in place.

If you are covering the ends with tarp

  • you will need to remove the wirelock channel first.

This may seem like double work, but the channel is now curved to the building with the required screw holes.

  • The end tarp cover is sandwiched between the hoop and the bottom of the wirelock channel.
  • When you pull the tarp over the peak, you will reinstall the wirelock channel from the top and work down.
  • If you do the left, right or bottom first will be determined by where the wrinkles are (if any).

Please don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions at all and please watch the videos on our YouTube channel for more information

Installing Multi Shelter Solutions Buildings

One of the most common questions we get asked is regarding installation of our structures. We have tried to create a simple yet effective solution for your applications, and recently have revamped our installation guide with more pictures, a glossary and more detailed instructions about everything to empower our customer more.

These structures are supplied as kits, intended for our customer to be able to install themselves. We are available for whatever questions you may have. We have confidence that you will be able to install these structures yourselves with a small team of people. You will get a complete manual with every order. You can download our instruction manual through the links below for a preview or to prepare for your delivery.

There is quite a bit of information contained in this manual that it CRITICAL to be understood. These structures are more complex to assemble than your typical Swedish Furniture.

The pages are in the order they should be read.
#1-2 are very important notes about installation and the rest of the manual.
1. START HERE
2. Warranty, Codes & Site Requirements
3. Anchoring-Base Brackets
3. Anchoring-Anchor Posts
4. ridge & hoops
5. Purlins & Windbraces
6. -optional- Cross Ties
7. Covering-Plastic Roof
7. Covering-Tarp Roof
8. -optional- Roll up Side Walls
9. Wirelock & Side Wall Cover Fasteners
10. -optional- Inflator Fan
11. Ends
12. -optional- Door Options

click here to download a step by step breakdown of the process in PDF format and click here to see a photo explanation of the process. You can also view the additional articles, links or videos on our how to page. Please note, not all pages or options apply to everyone. TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MANUAL ABOVE, NOT AS A STAND ALONE RESOURCE.

Please see our more detailed installation page for more information

Covering Ends – Plastic & Tarp

Please refer to the Ends page in the assembly guide as well

When you are covering the ends of the structure, there are some similarities and some fundamental differences when you are covering with plastic or with tarp.

The aluminum wirelock channel must be installed on the top side of the hoop before you start the cover. The framing must also be in place before you are putting on the cover.

Your cover will be a rectangle and you must double check if the two ends were supplied as one piece or not.

  • You start at the base of one side and go continuously over the peak so that there is not an edge at the peak.
  • The cover gets fastened, temporarily, at the base first on either side of the door and then pull out to the corners.

If there is ANY wind, do into the wind side first.

  • Please remember that whenever you have wrinkles or folds, you will pull 90 degrees to the wrinkle.

Excess on the end covers will only get trimmed off after the roof cover is on as well.

If you are covering the end with plastic

  • you would go with the extra of your rectangle and fasten it temporarily to the back side of your framing.
  • At the very most, at this stage you will put part of a wire insert on either side of the peak.
  • When the cover is sitting smooth, you can put some strapping on the vertical framing to hole the cover in place.

If you are covering the ends with tarp

  • you will need to remove the wirelock channel first.

This may seem like double work, but the channel is now curved to the building with the required screw holes.

  • The end tarp cover is sandwiched between the hoop and the bottom of the wirelock channel.
  • When you pull the tarp over the peak, you will reinstall the wirelock channel from the top and work down.
  • If you do the left, right or bottom first will be determined by where the wrinkles are (if any).

Please don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions at all and please watch the videos on our YouTube channel for more information

Installing Before Winter

There always seems to be so much pressure and panic at this time to get a building before winter. The only thing that is important to get done sooner then later is the foundation work.

There will be lots of decent weather days between now and Christmas to get the job done.

If you think that it is too late to get it done and you will simply wait until next spring, please remember that you said the same thing last spring (or even a few months ago) and as usual the busyness of life got in the way.

Give us a call today to see how you can get that foundation taken care of before freeze up.

For those of you who want to get the structure up now and cover it in the spring, I urge you to cover the building sooner then later for a couple of reasons.

  1. First is that there will be lots of other things vying for your time in the spring
  2. Secondly, the more snow you have on that spot which has to melt, the more moisture you will have in the building.
    The more moisture you have in the building the more condensation issues you will have.

You want to give that ground the most time possible to dry up before you need to start using the building.

In my humble opinion, even though putting the cover on in late fall or early winter is more difficult and not pleasant, the benefits of having more time for the ground to dry, far outweigh the time spent to adjust the cover  in the spring

Installing Before Winter

There always seems to be so much pressure and panic at this time to get a building before winter. The only thing that is important to get done sooner then later is the foundation work. There will be lots of decent weather days between now and Christmas to get the job done.

If you think that it is too late to get it done and you will simply wait until next spring, please remember that you said the same thing last spring (or even a few months ago) and as usual the busyness of life got in the way. Give us a call today to see how you can get that foundation taken care of before freeze up.

For those of you who want to get the structure up now and cover it in the spring, I urge you to cover the building sooner then later for a couple of reasons. First is that there will be lots of other things vying for your time in the spring and secondly, the more snow you have on that spot which has to melt, the more moisture you will have in the building. The more moisture you have in the building the more condensation issues you will have. You want to give that ground the most time possible to dry up before you need to start using the building.

In my humble opinion, even though putting the cover on in late fall or early winter is more difficult and not pleasant, the benefits of having more time for the ground to dry, far outweigh the time spent to adjust the cover  in the spring

**NEW** Installation Photo Supplement

In addition to our assembly guide we have a step by step installation supplement and now a photo supplement as well to help with our customer assembled kits. It is NOT MEANT to replace reading the manual and is an
additional supplement only.

Please note, our smaller buildings will have fewer and smaller parts than what is pictured in the slide show. This shows installation with base brackets, NOT anchor posts. Please see assembly guide for further anchor post instruction.

This 24′ x 24′ structure was standing in 4 hours with a team of 4 people.

For best viewing of the photo supplement, click on photo one (top left corner of the grid and scroll through the slide show. Click the “X” in the top left corner to return to the main page.

Please call if you have any further questions after reviewing things. It’s easier to solve challenges before they become problems and with our 40+ years of experience, we can give you custom tips for your specific building to help everything go even smoother.

Greenhouses 101: Covering Options

We have previously covered the idea that while considering your structure choices you will have to weigh cost versus benefit or return. There is no area which this is more true then with cover choices. The wide range of cover choices include glass, polycarbonate, polyethylene and woven products. Within each of these products there is an equally great variety of choices. Along with each of these choices there is a huge variation in cost and function or performance.

At Multi Shelter Solutions we manufacture a wide range of shapes and sizes of predominantly plastic and tarp covered buildings. Because these buildings and shelters are narrower and have a reduced hoop spacing, we can use a lighter cover of the options available. The easiest way to get a comparative cost is to take the replacement cover cost divided by the years of expected life span to get an annual cover cost.

Our 6 mil plastic covers can be used as a single layer or double with air between for a 30% reduction in heat loss and to minimize condensation. These covers have a 4 year warranty against deterioration by the sun. Plastic is available in clear (greenhouses) and white (livestock shelters) and comes in various thicknesses. The average life span is 5 – 6 years for single layer and 6 – 8 years for double although 10 years is not uncommon.

Our 12mil white woven covers have a much greater tear resistance then plastic. This makes a good alternative when there will be some contact between product and cover. By providing shade, the white tarp is cooler in the summer. By still letting light in, it is warmer in the winter. Typical life span is 10 year. We offer a green tarp as well but due to the heat it absorbs, the life span is typically 3 years less then white.

You can see more info on these choices on our covering page or with the presentation video and the rest of the series Norm spoke on Greenhouses 101 here. Stay tuned for the end of  January 2016 when he presents Greenhouses 202! As always, we are happy to help you with any of your questions regarding planning or options as you are considering your structure purchase.

Putting up Structures after the Snowfall

There always seems to be so much pressure and panic at this time to get a building before winter. The only thing that is important to get done sooner then later is the foundation work. There will be lots of decent weather days between now and Christmas to get the job done.

If you think that it is too late to get it done and you will simply wait until next spring, please remember that you said the same thing last spring (or even a few months ago) and as usual the busyness of life got in the way. Give us a call today to see how you can get that foundation taken care of before freeze up.

For those of you who want to get the structure up now and cover it in the spring, I urge you to cover the building sooner then later for a couple of reasons. First is that there will be lots of other things vying for your time in the spring and secondly, the more snow you have on that spot which has to melt, the more moisture you will have in the building. The more moisture you have in the building the more condensation issues you will have. You want to give that ground the most time possible to dry up before you need to start using the building.

In my humble opinion, even though putting the cover on in late fall or early winter is more difficult and not pleasant, the benefits of having more time for the ground to dry, far outweigh the time spent to adjust the cover  in the spring

Cross Ties

We’ve had a number of questions regarding cross ties being missing from orders. This isn’t the case, and is done on purpose because the last cross tie interferes with the end cover, so we ship the orders “short” on cross ties to compensate for this. We are sorry for any confusion this has caused and are happy to help you with any other installation questions you may have.

Cross ties, also known as collar ties, are a horizontal bar in a structure which ties the left and right side together. They are usually 3’ to 4’ down from the peak. The purpose of cross ties is to add load strength to the structure. Many people look at cross ties as a nuisance because of lost head space but they have a three fold benefit.

By forming the triangle at the peak you create benefit for the dead load which is usually snow load. The top can not come down when the sides can not spread. By tying the left and right sides together, you create strength for the live load, commonly referred to as wind load. When the wind blows from the left, the right side holds it from pushing inward and vice versa. Most importantly, it decreases the rocking motion which can stress a building over time. The cross tie can also supply a very useful support area for things that need to be suspended. It is important to remember that when you spread out the load you create strength.

You can also see the complete manual, with additional tips here: https://multisheltersolutions.com/our-structure-options-coverings/installation-guide/ and our new how to videos here: https://multisheltersolutions.com/our-structure-options-coverings/how-to-videos/