Tag Archives: installation photos

Installing Multi Shelter Solutions Buildings

One of the most common questions we get asked is regarding installation of our structures. We have tried to create a simple yet effective solution for your applications, and recently have revamped our installation guide with more pictures, a glossary and more detailed instructions about everything to empower our customer more.

These structures are supplied as kits, intended for our customer to be able to install themselves. We are available for whatever questions you may have. We have confidence that you will be able to install these structures yourselves with a small team of people. You will get a complete manual with every order. You can download our instruction manual through the links below for a preview or to prepare for your delivery.

There is quite a bit of information contained in this manual that it CRITICAL to be understood. These structures are more complex to assemble than your typical Swedish Furniture.

The pages are in the order they should be read.
#1-2 are very important notes about installation and the rest of the manual.
1. START HERE
2. Warranty, Codes & Site Requirements
3. Anchoring-Base Brackets
3. Anchoring-Anchor Posts
4. ridge & hoops
5. Purlins & Windbraces
6. -optional- Cross Ties
7. Covering-Plastic Roof
7. Covering-Tarp Roof
8. -optional- Roll up Side Walls
9. Wirelock & Side Wall Cover Fasteners
10. -optional- Inflator Fan
11. Ends
12. -optional- Door Options

click here to download a step by step breakdown of the process in PDF format and click here to see a photo explanation of the process. You can also view the additional articles, links or videos on our how to page. Please note, not all pages or options apply to everyone. TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MANUAL ABOVE, NOT AS A STAND ALONE RESOURCE.

Please see our more detailed installation page for more information

Photos & Video: Purlins, Windbraces & Crossties

IMPORTANT wind braces are the longer pipes, purlins are the shorter ones, Cross ties are optional, and they are the longest pipes you will get (pictured below, not here)

Installing Purlins

 

How to install windbraces video is on our YouTube Channel

Below are examples of structures with cross-ties, bars going across the peak for larger structures. These are optional to reinforce the structure. Please see the supplemental Cross-Ties page in the installation guide as well as additional notes below the photos

We’ve had a number of questions regarding cross ties being missing from orders. This isn’t the case, and is done on purpose because the last cross tie interferes with the end cover, so we ship the orders “short” on cross ties to compensate for this. We are sorry for any confusion this has caused and are happy to help you with any other installation questions you may have.

Cross ties, also known as collar ties, are a horizontal bar in a structure which ties the left and right side together. They are usually 3’ to 4’ down from the peak. The purpose of cross ties is to add load strength to the structure. Many people look at cross ties as a nuisance because of lost head space but they have a three fold benefit.

  • By forming the triangle at the peak you create benefit for the dead load which is usually snow load. The top can not come down when the sides can not spread.
  • By tying the left and right sides together, you create strength for the live load, commonly referred to as wind load. When the wind blows from the left, the right side holds it from pushing inward and vice versa.
  • Most importantly, it decreases the rocking motion which can stress a building over time.
  • The cross tie can also supply a very useful support area for things that need to be suspended.

It is important to remember that when you spread out the load you create strength.Photos & Video: Purlins, Windbraces & Crossties

Photos & Video: Purlins, Windbraces & Crossties

IMPORTANT wind braces are the longer pipes, purlins are the shorter ones, Cross ties are optional, and they are the longest pipes you will get (pictured below, not here)

Installing Purlins

 

How to install windbraces video is on our YouTube Channel

Below are examples of structures with cross-ties, bars going across the peak for larger structures. These are optional to reinforce the structure. Please see the supplemental Cross-Ties page in the installation guide as well as additional notes below the photos

We’ve had a number of questions regarding cross ties being missing from orders. This isn’t the case, and is done on purpose because the last cross tie interferes with the end cover, so we ship the orders “short” on cross ties to compensate for this. We are sorry for any confusion this has caused and are happy to help you with any other installation questions you may have.

Cross ties, also known as collar ties, are a horizontal bar in a structure which ties the left and right side together. They are usually 3’ to 4’ down from the peak. The purpose of cross ties is to add load strength to the structure. Many people look at cross ties as a nuisance because of lost head space but they have a three fold benefit.

  • By forming the triangle at the peak you create benefit for the dead load which is usually snow load. The top can not come down when the sides can not spread.
  • By tying the left and right sides together, you create strength for the live load, commonly referred to as wind load. When the wind blows from the left, the right side holds it from pushing inward and vice versa.
  • Most importantly, it decreases the rocking motion which can stress a building over time.
  • The cross tie can also supply a very useful support area for things that need to be suspended.

It is important to remember that when you spread out the load you create strength.

**NEW** Installation Photo Supplement

In addition to our assembly guide we have a step by step installation supplement and now a photo supplement as well to help with our customer assembled kits. It is NOT MEANT to replace reading the manual and is an
additional supplement only.

Please note, our smaller buildings will have fewer and smaller parts than what is pictured in the slide show. This shows installation with base brackets, NOT anchor posts. Please see assembly guide for further anchor post instruction.

This 24′ x 24′ structure was standing in 4 hours with a team of 4 people.

For best viewing of the photo supplement, click on photo one (top left corner of the grid and scroll through the slide show. Click the “X” in the top left corner to return to the main page.

Please call if you have any further questions after reviewing things. It’s easier to solve challenges before they become problems and with our 40+ years of experience, we can give you custom tips for your specific building to help everything go even smoother.