Green Tarps Discontinued: Effective Immediately

We want to share new changes to our product offerings with any customers who have ordered the 12mil green tarp in the past or have an outstanding quote for it.

Since we have received relatively few calls for this product and our supplier is faced with a rather extreme minimum order, it has been decided that MSS will no longer offer the 12mil green tarp.

This is effective immediately and applies to any outstanding quotes as well.

For those that insist on green tarp, we will need to refer you to a company that makes the heavier tarp in various colours.

We appreciate your understanding and thank you for your trust in our products.

How to Prepare Your structure for Winter

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From our recent Winter Q&A

Segment #1: How to Prepare Your structure for Winter

  • What to include in the visual check
  • Potential Flying Debris
  • Drainage Around Your Building
  • Installing Temporary Snow Supports
  • Inflating Roll Up Sides for the Season
  • Making a Snow Removal Tool

Stay tuned for future Q&As and submit your questions to be featured!
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Featured Application: Golf Cart & Equipment Storage

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Another application that our structures are being increasingly used for is golf cart storage.

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These shelters provide golf course superintendents with economical winter protection for the carts and other equipment.

During peak season these shelters service as maintenance areas for equipment and storage for fertilizer.

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Multi Shelter Buildings are very versatile and the same building can be used for multiple applications. Call today to discuss your requirements and we can help you find just the right structure for your needs.

Adding a Softcover Structure to the Side or End of Another Building

There are two ways of adding a structure to the side of a building. It can be done as a lean-to (half structure) that goes parallel to the building and up to the eave, or it can be a complete building at 90 degrees to the existing building. This article applies to the latter option.

When considering attaching an MSS structure at 90 degrees to another building, there are some important considerations to be mindful of before the purchase.

The first is that these buildings are almost always considered high humidity (especially when it is a greenhouse). This means that you will be subjecting that wall to a higher level of moisture. Extra waterproofing should be considered. This high level of humidity should be an extra concern if the intent is to use the warm air as a source of heat for the solid building.

The other thing to bear in mind is the potential snow shedding patterns from the bigger building roof. If the height difference is more than 2’, measures should be implemented to slow the process of shedding snow. Without slowing the rate that the snow comes off the taller building, the force of the impact could be triple or quadruple the weight of the actual snow.

If there is a likelihood of significant snow levels being shed, we recommend reducing the rib spacing of the first 12’ of the building. Going from 4’ to 3’ spacing will increase the strength by 1/3. Going from 3’ to 2’ is a 50% increase in strength. This will give your building the added strength for the impact of shedding snow and the volume that would potentially be on the roof.

The third thing that needs to be considered is how the cover will be fastened to your shelter at the wall. For a stand-alone building, you would be on a ladder or platform off the end but this is not possible if the end hoop is right against the wall.

One option is to have the first hoop about 2’ from the wall and then cover that section with something solid (plywood, sheet metal, Lexan, etc.). This will give you a place to crawl up and secure the cover into the wirelock.

Another option would have you put the first hoop about ½” to 1” from the wall. The wirelock channel would be installed on the underside of that hoop. During the cover installation, you would slide the cover through the gap and then wrap the cover around to the bottom. The wire inserts would be installed from the underside. This option is a little more tricky when doing the double plastic cover. After the cover is installed, the gap can be filled with square foam strips which are available at the building centers. Extra care must be exercised to protect the cover from bolt heads and nuts.

The third option would be to install the structure as per normal but about 1’ from the wall. The covering would be done as usual and once this is complete, the building would be slid up against the wall. This process is a bit risky since the building is not secured to the anchors for a short period. The longer the building is, the more challenging this option is.

The last challenge which needs some attention has to do with the method of ventilation which will be used. Typical ventilation flows through the building. In this scenario, ventilating though the building would also mean that you have to go through the attached building. It can be done, but you would be best to get some additional advice on the process.

If roll-up sides are going to be used, it must be noted that the attached building will interfere with proper airflow.

The challenge with using forced ventilation is “where does the air get into the building. It would be best to create a sketch of the building with thoughts as to what you intend to do. We will use our experience to advise you.

It is important to understand and work through these challenges before you purchase. We are here to advise.

How MSS Coordinates Deliveries & Back Orders for Top Customer Satisfaction During Challenging Times

[click to watch video]

Working With Our Customers for Mutual Benefit on Deliveries

Multi Shelter Solutions has always been known for working with its customers.

This is particularly true for coordinating deliveries to minimize freight costs. It is more than just saving on freight, though.

Our deliveries ensure that the product gets to you when it is supposed to and in the condition it is supposed to.

Occasionally we are faced with a situation where a shipment is not complete at the promised delivery date. It has always been our policy to still ship the order with the back order going out at our expense.

We deem it more important to keep you happy and on schedule than worry about the additional expense.

We know it’s well known, but with fuel prices going up at unprecedented rates and supply chain issues ongoing, meeting this commitment has become even more of a challenge and required more creative solutions.

It has also emphasized how critical good communication between all parties is. You need to have timely and accurate information on your order status and we need accurate information on your schedule.

It is pointless for us to show up with an incomplete order when you are not ready for it.

We hope that we have built up a level of trust where you feel comfortable giving us this information, while knowing we are working hard on your behalf.

Through good dialogue, we can minimize the impact of these delays for both of us.

We appreciate the trust you have shown in us by placing your order with Multi Shelter Solutions. We will always look forward to working with you on your project through to completion and in the days that follow

Adding a Softcover Structure to the Side or End of Another Building

There are two ways of adding a structure to the side of a building. It can be done as a lean-to (half structure) that goes parallel to the building and up to the eave, or it can be a complete building at 90 degrees to the existing building. This article applies to the latter option.

When considering attaching an MSS structure at 90 degrees to another building, there are some important considerations to be mindful of before the purchase.

The first is that these buildings are almost always considered high humidity (especially when it is a greenhouse). This means that you will be subjecting that wall to a higher level of moisture. Extra waterproofing should be considered. This high level of humidity should be an extra concern if the intent is to use the warm air as a source of heat for the solid building.

The other thing to bear in mind is the potential snow shedding patterns from the bigger building roof. If the height difference is more than 2’, measures should be implemented to slow the process of shedding snow. Without slowing the rate that the snow comes off the taller building, the force of the impact could be triple or quadruple the weight of the actual snow.

If there is a likelihood of significant snow levels being shed, we recommend reducing the rib spacing of the first 12’ of the building. Going from 4’ to 3’ spacing will increase the strength by 1/3. Going from 3’ to 2’ is a 50% increase in strength. This will give your building the added strength for the impact of shedding snow and the volume that would potentially be on the roof.

The third thing that needs to be considered is how the cover will be fastened to your shelter at the wall. For a stand-alone building, you would be on a ladder or platform off the end but this is not possible if the end hoop is right against the wall.

One option is to have the first hoop about 2’ from the wall and then cover that section with something solid (plywood, sheet metal, Lexan, etc.). This will give you a place to crawl up and secure the cover into the wirelock.

Another option would have you put the first hoop about ½” to 1” from the wall. The wirelock channel would be installed on the underside of that hoop. During the cover installation, you would slide the cover through the gap and then wrap the cover around to the bottom. The wire inserts would be installed from the underside. This option is a little more tricky when doing the double plastic cover. After the cover is installed, the gap can be filled with square foam strips which are available at the building centers. Extra care must be exercised to protect the cover from bolt heads and nuts.

The third option would be to install the structure as per normal but about 1’ from the wall. The covering would be done as usual and once this is complete, the building would be slid up against the wall. This process is a bit risky since the building is not secured to the anchors for a short period. The longer the building is, the more challenging this option is.

The last challenge which needs some attention has to do with the method of ventilation which will be used. Typical ventilation flows through the building. In this scenario, ventilating though the building would also mean that you have to go through the attached building. It can be done, but you would be best to get some additional advice on the process.

If roll-up sides are going to be used, it must be noted that the attached building will interfere with proper airflow.

The challenge with using forced ventilation is “where does the air get into the building. It would be best to create a sketch of the building with thoughts as to what you intend to do. We will use our experience to advise you.

It is important to understand and work through these challenges before you purchase. We are here to advise.