Orders, Delivery & Pricing Update

It has always been MSS’s style to provide the necessary or requested information and pricing to people, and then let you do the required number crunching and planning and take the time you need. We have never made a practice of pressuring anyone to buy before they are ready. The current and changing circumstances warrants us to give you a heads up however.

Our lead times will continue to be a minimum of 8 weeks due to the extra work involved with COVID protocols. We are also going through a time of significant price uncertainty so pricing and quotes can only be guaranteed for 30 days.

The more notice we receive on the structure(s) you wish to purchase, the better we can guarantee it to arrive when you need it.

We are grateful for the way that our customers are thinking ahead for their structure purchases. We thank you for the opportunity of working with you on your shelter and greenhouse projects.

We wish you a happy new year and a safe and prosperous spring.

Thanks
Norm Eygenraam, President

New Delivery to Newfoundland!

A chance for Newfoundland growers to save on greenhouse shipping!

**DEADLINE FOR ORDERING FEBRUARY 12, 2021**

Right now we are gearing up to come to the island again in April and are offering a group delivery discount for anyone in Newfoundland to get in on the upcoming delivery run!

This is your opportunity to save. If you act quickly, you can get in on this load and have your building delivered to your door by the manufacturer.

For a long time now the growers in eastern Canada have worked together with us to make their structure shipping less expensive and more timely.

By planning ahead, we group things together so the freight component is less. Get your order in before Feb 12th to take advantage of these savings! We look forward to helping you with your project!

Growing Over Winter in a Greenhouse

There are quite a few ways to make a greenhouse more heat efficient to make it feasible to grow either through the winter or for a large part of it.

The first thing to determine is what crop(s) you wish to grow since a number of plant varieties would be considered cold weather crops. The heat requirement would be considerably less.

Since the majority of heat loss is through the roof, the most common method of making a greenhouse more heat efficient is by adding a layer of plastic to the outside. With the benefit of a small blower there is an air pocket created. The closer that this air pocket is to “dead air” the less heat transfer that there would be. 10 to 15 cm is considered the ideal gap. When there is more then 15cm there will start to be movement of air and greater heat transfer. It is impossible to have a perfectly uniform space because of the way the plastic goes over the ridge and is fastened around the edges.

It is important not to have any holes in the plastic. The resulting air loss with a hole would result in air movement and less heat efficiency.

It is often thought that a lower greenhouse is easier to heat since there is less surface area to lose heat. The reality is that the bigger air volume of a taller greenhouse is less likely to have the temperature fluctuate.

To make a structure more heat efficient, the north wall could be insulated. Care has to be exercised in insulating ends since it is important not to create extra shading. Insulation can be put flat on the ground around the structure as a way of slowing down the cold radiating into the structure.

Another trick that some people have used effectively to reduce heat requirements is to make small tunnels over the beds of vegetables. This works well for the night time. It is important to have this cover removed in the day time to maximize the value of the sunlight.

If your intention is to only use part of a larger structure through the winter, it is wise to hand a curtain for the length of the ridge and then only use the south facing side. This maximizes the benefit of the sun and minimizes the effect of the cold wind.

With a little creativity it is easy to get benefits from the greenhouse even in the winter.