Tag Archives: large structures

Structures on Blocks or Shipping Containers

Storage containers and over sized concrete blocks are the economical solution for needing to elevate structures to create more storage capacity.

One consideration is when the product being stored does not lend itself to stacking, such as salt, sand or soil, there is the added dimension of outward push on the wall. Not only does the pile push outwardly, but an operator scooping the product will create even greater push.

Storage containers and over sized concrete blocks are the economical solution for such a situation. The weight and the stability which both the containers and blocks give, eliminates the need to anchor into the ground.

Containers are often simply put on the ground.

When going more then two layers with the blocks, there should be a concrete pad or special preparation of the soil to provide stability.

When choosing this foundation method, it is important to consider how and where the shelter will shed water and snow.

The top of the wall or container must be sealed to the possibility of moisture going inside.

The other thing that must be given proper consideration is that the shelter is able to deal with the extra wind load created by elevating the shelter this much.

In most of these installations, the wind load on a building is at least double of what it would be if mounted on the ground.

sand storage on blocks Haystorage on blocksBrunelle Container pictures 001Brunelle Container pictures 012

Cold Weather Poly Install

Many people in the fall are faced with the prospect of putting covers on in less than ideal weather. As long as the temperature is cold, everything stays quite taunt. As the temperature eventually starts to warm up, you will be faced with the inevitable wrinkles. You will need to tighten the cover to prevent premature wear due to flapping in the wind.

Tightening does not have to be done all at once. You can do half one day and half on another. It is important to remember that you are always pulling at 90 degrees to the wrinkles. Most of the tightening will need to be done lengthwise first.

If you have a loose cover and no time this week to tighten things, there is a temporary fix! Take a soft length of rope (do not use nylon!) and throw it over the building where the cover is particularly loose. Tie the rope off at the base as tight as you can.

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Structures on Blocks or Shipping Containers

There has often been the need to elevate structures to create more storage capacity. When the product being stored does not lend itself to stacking, such as salt, sand or soil, there is the added dimension of outward push on the wall. Not only does the pile push outwardly, but an operator scooping the product will create even greater push.

Storage containers and over sized concrete blocks are the economical solution for such a storage requirement. The weight and the stability which both the containers and blocks give, eliminates the need to anchor into the ground. Containers are often simply put on the ground. When going more then two layers with the blocks, there should be a concrete pad or special preparation of the soil to provide stability.

When choosing this foundation method, it is important to consider how and where the shelter will shed water and snow. The top of the wall or container must be sealed to the possibility of moisture going inside. The other thing that must be given proper consideration is that the shelter is able to deal with the extra wind load created by elevating the shelter this much. In most of these installations, the wind load on a building is at least double of what it would be if mounted on the ground.

sand storage on blocks Haystorage on blocksBrunelle Container pictures 001Brunelle Container pictures 012

Outdoor Farm Show: We look forward to seeing you, 2 more days!

IMG_20150915_092639

We have been doing this show for over 20 years, but this year at the Outdoor Farm Show we have a special booth. We are excited to announce that we are collaborating with one of our long time customers, John & Eadie Steele from Shepherd’s Choice. If you didn’t get a chance to come out yesterday, you’re in luck because there’s still two more days! We are in Woodstock at Canada’s Outdoor Park from 8:30am-5pm today and tomorrow. We look forward to seeing you out!
http://www.outdoorfarmshow.com/
http://www.shepherdschoice.ca/about.html

Putting up Structures after the Snowfall

There always seems to be so much pressure and panic at this time to get a building before winter. The only thing that is important to get done sooner then later is the foundation work. There will be lots of decent weather days between now and Christmas to get the job done.

If you think that it is too late to get it done and you will simply wait until next spring, please remember that you said the same thing last spring (or even a few months ago) and as usual the busyness of life got in the way. Give us a call today to see how you can get that foundation taken care of before freeze up.

For those of you who want to get the structure up now and cover it in the spring, I urge you to cover the building sooner then later for a couple of reasons. First is that there will be lots of other things vying for your time in the spring and secondly, the more snow you have on that spot which has to melt, the more moisture you will have in the building. The more moisture you have in the building the more condensation issues you will have. You want to give that ground the most time possible to dry up before you need to start using the building.

In my humble opinion, even though putting the cover on in late fall or early winter is more difficult and not pleasant, the benefits of having more time for the ground to dry, far outweigh the time spent to adjust the cover  in the spring

Cross Ties

We’ve had a number of questions regarding cross ties being missing from orders. This isn’t the case, and is done on purpose because the last cross tie interferes with the end cover, so we ship the orders “short” on cross ties to compensate for this. We are sorry for any confusion this has caused and are happy to help you with any other installation questions you may have.

Cross ties, also known as collar ties, are a horizontal bar in a structure which ties the left and right side together. They are usually 3’ to 4’ down from the peak. The purpose of cross ties is to add load strength to the structure. Many people look at cross ties as a nuisance because of lost head space but they have a three fold benefit.

By forming the triangle at the peak you create benefit for the dead load which is usually snow load. The top can not come down when the sides can not spread. By tying the left and right sides together, you create strength for the live load, commonly referred to as wind load. When the wind blows from the left, the right side holds it from pushing inward and vice versa. Most importantly, it decreases the rocking motion which can stress a building over time. The cross tie can also supply a very useful support area for things that need to be suspended. It is important to remember that when you spread out the load you create strength.

You can also see the complete manual, with additional tips here: https://multisheltersolutions.com/our-structure-options-coverings/installation-guide/ and our new how to videos here: https://multisheltersolutions.com/our-structure-options-coverings/how-to-videos/