Tag Archives: multi shelter solutions palmerston

Important Winter Care Articles

We have published a few articles regarding winter care and maintenance, and suggest anyone who has purchased a structure from us to review them to make sure your shelter is safe over this winter. As always, we are available for anything you are wondering or concerned about. We would be happy to help.

Winter Care & Maintenance
Winter Storm and Your Structures
Putting up Structures After Snowfall
Weather Cautions
Cold Weather Poly Install
Temporary Fix for a Loose Cover
Retightening a Loose Cover
Installing Before Winter

Winter Storm and Your Structures

Winter Storm & Your Structures

Many areas have been hit with freezing rain today and even though it has generally not been enough to warrant concern for the structures, it is a good time to recap some common things when dealing with ice on buildings.

It is important to note that the ice in itself is not an issue, even a very thick layer actually has enough strength to become self supporting. There are two potential problems though:

  • If the ice stays on the building, it usually has a rough enough texture that subsequent snow will not likely slide off. This scenario lead to major problems in previous winters when we had freezing rain, followed by a dump of snow and then we had rain. This can triple the weight on a building in very short order.
  • The other potential problem happens when you are attempting to remove the ice from the building. If the ice layer is not too significant you can gently bump the cover from the inside. ALWAYS start bumping the cover from the top. This way ice will slide over ice. Starting from the bottom creates a potential where the ice sliding down will fall back against the building and slash the cover. NEVER do all of one side and then the other. Work both sides simultaneously.

If there is the slightest doubt in your mind about the amount of weight on the building, bump the cover from the outside using something with a long handle.

If in doubt please don’t hesitate to ask.

The benefits of going to a bigger structure

What are some of the benefits of going with a bigger structure over a smaller structure?

Budget often dictates that someone needs to start small, especially when a person is just starting out as a grower with a greenhouse.
There is also the perceived notion that staying smaller means less heating cost. In itself, that is true, since heat loss is in direct proportion to surface area exposed to the outside.

As I have mentioned before, it is very important to weigh expense
against return.

A smaller air volume has less natural circulation.
Proper air circulation for plants is critical regardless of the season.
Think of a deep pond versus a shallow pond. The deep pond never has algae on the surface because of the increased movement.

Going with a taller greenhouse will automatically increase the circulation the same way.

Another point to consider with a taller greenhouse, is that there is more open space above the plants.

This open space is where moisture can go, away from the plants even before the greenhouse ventilation system does its job.

With a lower greenhouse, moisture is always in close proximity to the plants. In a taller structure, the plants will be dry much sooner.

Moist plants in a stagnant air mass are prone to disease. These plants will, as a result, produce less.

As always, be aware of the bigger picture.

Featured Product: Salt Storage

salt storage

It’s prime time to get your salt storage structures from Multi Shelter Solutions to be delivered before the weather takes a turn!

We offer many sizes to choose from, and can custom manufacture for your unique situation as well.

They can be mounted on blocks, shipping containers or direct to a ground beam or with anchor posts.Check out the pages below for extra pricing and information regarding these structures, and call us for your custom quote! We look forward to helping you find your shelter solution

Salt and Sand Storage
Large Storage

It’s Not Too Late!

We understand there is a rush on to get your structures before the ground is frozen and snow is here, but it’s not too late! We are operating with approximately a 4 week turn around right now, which takes us to late November/early December.

We often recommend getting your base in place as soon as you can, whether that’s having us send you anchor posts before delivery, or laying down the beam and foundation with the t-post anchors to be ready once you get the shipment of hoops and other materials.

We also have many years experience in coaching winter installations and can help you prepare. Contact us today for your shelter quote and to get in on our next delivery run your way!

Protect Your Equipment With Economical Storage

high profile

We have a variety of shapes and sizes to suit your equipment storage needs.

Our buildings can have very straight sidewalls for more interior space with or without putting it a wall.

The recommended covering is a 12 mil woven plastic tarp that is a three layer white, or green canvas. This will prevent excessive wear and tear on the cover if equipment is bumping into it.

Putting your equipment in a storage building reduces fading by the sun and helps your investment last longer

Please see our Large Storage page for more information and don’t hesitate to call us with any questions regarding this application.

Featured Product: Swimming Pool Enclosures

swimmingCovering your pool gives you many benefits

  • extending your swimming season
  • increased privacy while swimming
  • significantly reduces the amount of chlorine that is used during the season
  • reduces the need to sweep your pool as often.
  • Enjoy swimming without the mosquitoes!

The typical package is sold with a double clear cover and a roll up side wall kit.

The structure can be fastened directly to your deck or anchored beside the concrete. Consider placing the structure off center to create extra walking/lounging space along one side.

See our Swimming Pool Enclosures page for more information

Wirelock & Sidewall Cover Fasteners

 Most buildings come with enough wirelock to be installed on top of the first and last hoop. Additional wirelock can be purchased to run along the sidewall, or to be used to attach the covering to the end framing or doors if desired.

The end wall tarp is sandwiched between channel and hoop, inserts hold the roof tarp in place. Please see videos on our covering FAQ page for more details

By installing the end channel and then removing it to install the end cover, your channel will be pre-bent and have the correct holes.

  •  Generally the channel is installed on the top of the end hoop with the open side UP
  • The plain channel does not have a front or a back, it is symmetrical.
  • Start at the bottom of the end hoop and work your way up, generally centered on the hoop
  • Secure with #12 x 3/4” speed screws at 12” centers, (small head screws give less wire interference)
  • Carefully line up the ends of consecutive pieces to eliminate edges which can tear the cover
  • Once you get to the top of the hoop, simply lean on the channel to bend it and then go down the other side
  • If you must cut at the top, wrap the ridge with duct tape to prevent cover tears
  • You will need to cut the last piece of channel to make it fit
  • If your structure is butted against a building it is easier to install the channel on the bottom of the hoop (please call for some additional instructions)

Side Wall Cover Fasteners (you have 3 choices)

Notes: Pipe Straps are supplied when a structure has roll-up side walls and/or anchor posts options. When base board (wood or steel) is fastened with pipe straps, the base board should be pushed in so that it butts into the last hoop

sidewall-fastenersPlease see our wirelock & sidewall cover fasteners page from the installation manual for more details and photos

Featured Add-On: Center Pivoting Gable Vent

We wanted to remind everyone of the center pivoting gable vent that we offer as a simple solution to the challenges of venting a building.

For venting to be effective, it has to be as high as possible. This is a cost effective alternative to costly roof vents.

Part of the window swings in and part of it goes out. Because of this

  • rain is never an issue
  • the window is easy to control even in extreme winds.
  • Incoming air is always deflected up to mix with the warmest air.
  • The tubular steel construction makes it both lightweight and resist twisting over time.

A continuous rope goes from the top of the window to a pulley at the ridge, down to ground level and back up to another pulley and then to the bottom of the window. By tying the rope off to an eye bolt on a gable post, this allows for very simple control from ground level.

Please don’t hesitate to call us for more details or with any questions you have about this option for your building!

vent3Vent4

Anchoring: Base Brackets vs Anchor Posts

edit-Base Bracketanchor post photo

We offer two main types of anchoring for our structures: Base Brackets (left pic) and Anchor Posts (right pic).

Which one you decide to go with largely depends on your application and location. They are not to be used together, it is a one or the other option. No matter which option you choose, please be aware, there is no such thing as too many anchors!

Although the building can be anchored directly into the ground with Anchor Posts, it can also sit on a slab, curb or beam or it can be elevated on some sort of a wall. Base brackets with lag bolts are supplied standard to fasten the building to the chosen form of foundation. Anchor Posts are available at an additional cost.

Anchor Posts must be set into concrete when:

  • the soil has been recently excavated (within the last 5 years)
  • it is required by the building code (use of concrete usually classifies the building as permanent)
  • extremely windy and exposed areas exist (at least use on the corner posts)
  • more than 10% of the anchor post will be out of the ground (upgrading anchor post size may be needed)
  • there are areas where erosion has been a problem in the past

Anchor Posts SHOULD NOT be used (and base brackets used instead) when:

  • the soil is a very heavy clay (heaving would be a constant problem)
  • there is a shallow rock layer
  • there are major amounts of rocks interfering with the accuracy of anchor post setting
  • the structure will be moved shortly (anchor posts must be cleaned out before reusing)

**Recommendations are based on years of experience. Ultimately the customer is responsible to properly anchor a structure**
Please see our installation pages for a more detailed breakdown of this topic Base Brackets vs Anchor Posts