What is the best size and shape for what I want to do?

Covering the sizes we are offering and when it would be best to choose from the website for a more custom situation.

Determining the space that is required to meet your objectives will be your first consideration. This goes beyond the foot print or floor space which you would need for the plants you wish to grow.

In our Self Sufficiency packages, we are offering the convenience of 3 choices. There may be a situation where none of these choices will meet your short term objectives or long term goals. If that is the case, it would be advisable to explore our website for a more suitable package in the context of what you are learning here. The self sufficiency packages are meant as a simple starting point, but sometimes simple isn’t always the best choice

If it is your goal ultimately to have more than one greenhouse, consideration needs to be given for how the second or third building would fit on your property. As an example, if you have a total of 50’ wide available and you build 16’ now, it restricts your future options. Going a little longer now (if that fills the space) is much cheaper and simpler than doing an addition.

If it is not your intent to grow (and heat) through the winter time, it would be important to have a structure which would efficiently shed snow. Using a more snow efficient shape does not mean that the structure can be left totally unattended for extended periods of time. If that is going to be your situation, we have options for building structures to meet that requirement with closer arch spacing.

A very important reason for needing a taller building would be the need to use the vertical growing option. You will be able to grow more rows on that foot print because of the side clearance provided. If you plan to only grow short crops in the soil a lower greenhouse will work.

A point that many overlook in their consideration of the importance of side height is that they intend to work the ground with a rototiller.

A final point for the shape consideration, has to do with wind load. Wind load increases exponentially as the building is taller. Especially if your property dictates orienting the building across an extreme prevailing wind, it would be advisable to go with a lower profile.

Here is to comprehensive planning!

EBOOK now available!

Now available as an ebook!
So you want to buy a greenhouse… Your guide to planning your greenhouse purchase!

Check it out 🙂 and, there’s special savings if you’ve already purchased the paperback through Amazon.

If you’ve purchased the paperback at a trade show or from the office and want an ecopy, email us at multisheltersales@gmail.com with a pic of you and the book, and we’ll help you out.

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Large Greenhouses

We have a variety of widths and lengths of greenhouse structures from which to choose.

If you’re just trying to get a head start on the garden vegetable season (and maybe extending the growing season by a couple of weeks) consider our free-standing structures which use just one layer of poly.

If your intent is to grow all year round and heat the greenhouse then you should be looking at our greenhouse packages that offer a double poly roof, inflator fan kit and roll-up sidewalls for better heat efficiency.

COLDFRAME vs. GREENHOUSE

COLD FRAME usually has a single plastic covered structure and used as a season extender
GREENHOUSE usually has a double plastic cover with air in between and sides that roll up for year round use for better heat efficiency.

AVAILABLE OPTIONS

  • Custom widths, heights & hoop spacing
  • Roof vents & forced ventilation packages
  • Various types & sizes of doors with end framing priced separately
  • 8mm polycarbonate sheeting for roof and/or ends
  • Roll up sides for natural ventilation & reduced condensation
  • Cross ties for added rigidity, hanging baskets or crop support

The benefits of going to a bigger structure

What are some of the benefits of going with a bigger structure over a smaller structure?

Budget often dictates that someone needs to start small, especially when a person is just starting out as a grower with a greenhouse.
There is also the perceived notion that staying smaller means less heating cost. In itself, that is true, since heat loss is in direct proportion to surface area exposed to the outside.

As I have mentioned before, it is very important to weigh expense
against return.

A smaller air volume has less natural circulation.
Proper air circulation for plants is critical regardless of the season.
Think of a deep pond versus a shallow pond. The deep pond never has algae on the surface because of the increased movement.

Going with a taller greenhouse will automatically increase the circulation the same way.

Another point to consider with a taller greenhouse, is that there is more open space above the plants.

This open space is where moisture can go, away from the plants even before the greenhouse ventilation system does its job.

With a lower greenhouse, moisture is always in close proximity to the plants. In a taller structure, the plants will be dry much sooner.

Moist plants in a stagnant air mass are prone to disease. These plants will, as a result, produce less.

As always, be aware of the bigger picture.