Storage on Blocks or Shipping Containers

Storage containers and over sized concrete blocks are the economical solution for needing to elevate structures to create more storage capacity.

One consideration is when the product being stored does not lend itself to stacking, such as salt, sand or soil, there is the added dimension of outward push on the wall. Not only does the pile push outwardly, but an operator scooping the product will create even greater push.

Storage containers and over sized concrete blocks are the economical solution for such a situation. The weight and the stability which both the containers and blocks give, eliminates the need to anchor into the ground.

Containers are often simply put on the ground.

When going more then two layers with the blocks, there should be a concrete pad or special preparation of the soil to provide stability.

When choosing this foundation method, it is important to consider how and where the shelter will shed water and snow.

The top of the wall or container must be sealed to the possibility of moisture going inside.

The other thing that must be given proper consideration is that the shelter is able to deal with the extra wind load created by elevating the shelter this much.

In most of these installations, the wind load on a building is at least double of what it would be if mounted on the ground.

sand storage on blocks Haystorage on blocksBrunelle Container pictures 001Brunelle Container pictures 012

Important Notes About Hanleys & Warranties

Norm wants to caution anyone modifying their tunnel (or any structure) as this compromises the entire concept of the structure as well as voids the warranty and can start a whole host of other issues. Please call and speak directly with Norm, as well as read ALL the material on our website and installation manual before embarking on what can be economical and easy to use season extenders, or, very costly mistakes. Thank you for your interest

Hanley tunnels season extenders modified hanley

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**NEW** Self Sufficiency Packages

As an interest in growing our own food and being more self sufficient becomes an important value in today’s society, Multi Shelter Solutions wants to offer a solution to those new to growing: something simple, practical and easy to get started

~ Slightly higher ~ Snow Resistant ~ Not high enough for Wind Impact ~

STEPS FOR CHOICE

  1. Choose Your Size
  2. Choose Your Cover Option
  3. Choose Any Add On Value Option
  4. Place Your Order

Please see the download package for full details on all these steps

1. SIZE OPTIONS

Single: 10′ x 9′ x 8’8″
Double: 14′ x 24′ x 9’7″
Family: 18′ x 30′ x 10’6″

Please note, these packages are different from our MADE TO ORDER STRUCTURE KITS, as these are meant to speed up quoting and ordering, and as such are not able to be modified to be eligible for the special package pricing for these units. They do NOT have engineered drawings available and are sold for customer assembly.

2. COVER OPTIONS

Basic: Season Extender, Single Plastic
Deluxe: Year Round, double plastic, roll up sides, inflator fan

3. ADD ON VALUE OPTIONS

Base Option: Includes pressure treated 4x4s with t-post anchors and fasteners
Vertical Growing Option: Added Roll up Pipe for hanging baskets
Movable Option: Added Skis for versatile growing locations
Ventilation Option: Added Exhaust Fan, Motorized Louvres and Thermostat

4. CONTACT US FOR QUESTIONS & ORDERING

1-866-838-6729
multisheltersolutions @ gmail (dot) com

click to download below slide show in a printable pdf

In the following weeks, we will be sharing some articles to help you learn more about growing and considerations for your greenhouse purchase. You can subscribe to have them delivered to your inbox, or you can also click the links below to view them right away.

1. Where is the best place to put the greenhouse?

Factors that determine optimum location for growing, air flow, snow shedding and ground moisture

2. What is the best size and shape for what I want to do?

Covering the sizes we are offering and when it would be best to choose from the website for a more custom situation.

3. How do I make sure it stays where it is supposed to?

Pointers on anchoring, what kind of things will impact holding power of anchors, anchoring after moving a structure

4. How Can I make my greenhouse its best?

Different tips to make it more efficient, proper space for plants, proper light, when to heat and not

5. What are the considerations for growing over the summer?

Ventilation, excess heat, making sure roll up sides are critter proof

6. What are the considerations for growing over winter?

Heating, interior tunnels, air circulation, humidity control

We look forward to helping you with your projects!

Season Extension: Moving Your Structure

A significant part of season extension involves moving an intact structure.

This basically allows you to get two (or possibly three) plots of production from one investment.

The idea is to start a relatively cold tolerant crop very early in the season (the timing will be different in different locations).

  1. Once the crop is firmly established in location A, (and it has warmed up) you will move the structure to location B and start another crop.
  2. You will harvest the crop in location A and then after working the soil, plant another crop in location A which is intended for fall harvesting.
  3. After location B is harvested and before frost you will move the structure back to A.
  4. Instead of doing twice in location A you could also choose location C.

A structure can be equipped with wheels which will run over the soil. There is quite a bit of flexibility where you go and the terrain you navigate.

The structure can be equipped with rollers on a track. This will determine where you go and this is usually intended for moving a bigger structure with fewer people.

The most common method of moving is sliding the structure on the soil. The base rail can be wood or steel.

It is critically import to understand the logistics of moving on a structure before you start. It is not hard to move a structure but it is also not hard to do damage.

Having a plan for proper anchoring is very important for a moveable structure. Your structure is at a vulnerable state when you release the anchors. Once you start, the job must be completed quickly. You have to be aware that the anchors may not come out or go back in easily so you may need to give yourself some extra time.

One other area of consideration on a moveable structure is the ends. There must be some sort of a flap or vent along the bottom so that when a structure is being moved, the ends will not uproot plant material. Generally speaking to have this ability in the ends takes away from the structural integrity, so some extra anchoring may be required.

You can see more information and photos on our movable information page. Please don’t hesitate to call us with ANY questions you may have. This can be a very useful addition to your structure, but must be understood correctly.

Stay tuned for part two and three of our season extension series later this week!

Season Extension: Ventilating & Heating

To make your greenhouse more of a year round functioning entity, there are two main areas in which you have to make the structure more efficient-Heating and Ventilation.

1. Heating is your biggest expense for the winter so retaining heat is a priority.

The easiest way to retain heat in your greenhouse is to install a double poly cover with air in between. A small squirrel cage blower attached to the inside layer of plastic aids in maintaining air between layers.

The more dead air space between these layers you can create, the closer you will be to achieving a 30% reduction in heat loss. Holes will result in air movement and therefore less efficiency. 3″-5″ consistent space is ideal. It is a given that you would have less then that around the edges and over the ridge.

Double plastic will have a considerably longer life span. It is important to realize that as plastic gets older, the light transmission will be reduced which will reduce production.

Infrared plastic (IR poly) does further reduce heat loss and increase light diffusion so it can also be a consideration when looking for ways to reduce heating costs.

2. Ventilation is also one of your biggest considerations for the warmer times of the year. Ventilation can be done through forced or mechanical methods or passive through vents or roll up sides.

Vents are extremely effective since they can be placed higher up where the heat needs to be expelled. Mechanical ventilation is more costly both up front and to operate but it is easier to control since it is attached to a thermostat. For mechanical ventilation to be effective, it needs to be sized and located properly.

Roll up sides are less costly and simpler to install but are restricted by the fact that you have to be there to open and to close.

Climate control is especially challenging in the spring and the fall since most days you will have the need for both ventilating and heating.

One area that you need to be especially aware of is stagnant air. Without proper air movement, circulation and exchanging, stagnant air can cause many different types of diseases. It is important to understand what your plants require

Stay tuned for the third and final installment of our series about Season Extension and Your Greenhouse coming soon!

Modified Hanley Tunnel

One of our most popular structures is the hanley tunnel because it is the cheapest way of covering an area for season extension.

As a way of addressing some of the challenges and limiting factors with the tunnels, we have come up with a modified hanley.

The two areas where it significantly improves on the regular tunnel are the side clearance and the peak for snow shedding. Instead of using 24’ of steel to make 17’ wide and 7’6” high, we are using 26’ of material to make 16’ wide and 9’ high. It still uses 28’ wide plastic with extra at the ends to make the same kind of “tails”.

Sliding the plastic up on the sides is still the way that the tunnel is ventilated and you will still have the same challenges as far as creating access.

The re-bar anchors, base plates, clasps and rope are the same on the modified hanley as they are for the regular tunnel. We supply 5’ more of extra plastic for the tails since the building is taller.

The peak on the end hoops are very hard on the plastic, so we have designed a more rounded hoop at each end. It is strongly recommended to have 3 guides ropes at each end to brace back to the anchoring posts of the plastic.

Any structure with ends is not considered a Hanley Tunnel. We are more than willing to discuss the differences and benefits/drawbacks between tunnels and cold frames should you wish to know more.

The main thing which is critical to understand before going with a modified hanley is the extra wind load which the structure will be subjected to. Going from 7’6” to 9’ high, results in a 40% increase in the wind load. This issue is what makes the correct tightness of the ropes an even more critical consideration.

It is also the reason why we strongly urge customers who
do not have any tunnel experience to start with a regular tunnel.