Featured Application: Salt & Sand Storage Buildings

salt storage

It’s prime time to get your salt storage structures from Multi Shelter Solutions to be delivered while it’s still great installation weather!

We offer many sizes to choose from, and can custom manufacture for your unique situation as well.

They can be mounted on blocks, shipping containers or direct to a ground beam or with anchor posts.Check out the pages below for extra pricing and information regarding these structures, and call us for your custom quote! We look forward to helping you find your shelter solution

Salt and Sand Storage
Large Storage

Featured Application: RV Cathedral Shelters

There are numerous applications where additional headspace takes priority over floor space. Multi Shelter Solutions has a CATHEDRAL shaped structure which is the result of simply taking a regular profile arch and reversing what is typically the top and bottom. This is another example of how our innovation creates a “custom” structure at standard pricing. This profile is our most snow resistant model. The 4 basic sizes combined with any length allow virtually any vehicle to be covered economically.

see our RV Cathedral Page for more information, pricing and the brochure

 

Air Circulation & Humidity Control

Even though many people would consider air circulation and humidity control as totally separate functions, they are closely intertwined.

You may have the proper sized openings to create the proper amount of air changes.

You could still have hot or cold spots in your greenhouse if you do not have proper circulation.

The same can be said about removing humidity.

For a ventilation system to have optimum efficiency and benefit, there must be balance. Having proper air circulation allows you to achieve that balance.

Horizontal air flow (HAF) fans typically come with a cage around the blades, a hanger bracket and a cord with plug. This allows them to be attached or suspended from the frame at the proper location. The motors are rarely more than 1/3 hp.

HAF fans always are installed in pairs and blow in opposite directions. A short greenhouse will have one in the front right corner and in the back left corner. A longer greenhouse will still have one in the front right and back left but also two half way down the length. The one on the right will blow in the same direction as the front right. The one on the left will be blowing in the same direction as the back left.

HAF fans should never be mounted in such a way that allows them to be blowing directly at plants. This would create an uneven drying. Some people will aim the fans slightly in the direction of the cover to ensure maximum air flow along the cover to maintain dry covers.

These fans run continuously to ensure that the temperature and humidity are spread evenly throughout. It also ensures that your thermostat or humidistat are reacting to air or moisture that is representative of what is going on in the greenhouse.

Ventilation is a difficult area of greenhouse production to get perfect. The more attention you pay to the details and modify what you are doing, the greater your production. The tricky part is that with all the variables, no two years will be the same. Carefully consider all your options and the situation you’re dealing with and you will have success!

The Variations of Passive Venting

In a nutshell, passive venting is creating an opening and letting the warm / hot air escape. The simplest form of this is opening a door or window. Just because it is simple does not mean that this method will be effective in cooling your greenhouse.

If your ends face into the prevailing winds, if you can make your doors big enough and if your greenhouse is short enough. That is a lot of “if’s” and you will still be doing a lot of running back and forth to have the correct amount of opening for the amount of ventilating you need to do.

We have already reviewed the most common form of passive ventilation in the roll up sides. It was noted that roll up sides work much better when paired with a high opening to create a chimney effect. It is a fact that hot air rises so the higher you can create an opening, the more effective it will be.

If you are relying solely on gable end windows, either motorized or manual, they will need to be quite large. You will also need to have the benefit of a regularly strong prevailing wind.

The most effective form of passive venting is a continuous roof vent. This will provide a continuous opening in the precise area where the air is the hottest. A roof vent should always be mounted down wind of the prevailing wind. The benefit of being down wind is that the wind creates a vacuum as it goes over the greenhouse and sucks the warm air out.  The air intake for a roof vent is often a roll up side.

A significant down side of a roof vent is the up-front cost. The cost is the same for a narrow and a wider structure. This is the reason they are almost exclusively put on wider buildings. The cost is simply spread out over a bigger area. The effectiveness of a roof vent still makes it appealing in spite of the cost.

Roof vents can be controlled manually with a chain fall opener or with a motorized gearbox. A motorized system can be a simple open / close controller that you set the limit switches or it can have a proportional controller that allows for pre-set stages. It is with an automatic controller that the benefit of the roof vent will really become apparent. Every couple of minutes it will react and adjust to the inside condition of the greenhouse.

All of the expenditures involved with your greenhouse need to be weighed as a cost versus benefit or cost versus return. This process is especially challenging when considering the options of ventilation. Many of the expenses are subtle and hard to measure. The returns are equally hard to quantify since weather is an additional variable. This makes it even more important to keep accurate records and be aware of your options for improvements.

Long Weekend Hours

Multi Shelter Solutions will be open on Canada Day and closed July 2nd. We will reopen 9am July 5th. Have a safe and happy holiday weekend!

Installing Wire Insert on Multiple Layers of Plastic

In response to a few questions about increased difficulty of installing the wire insert on 3 layers of 7.2 mil plastic. I have done my experiment with zero added degree of difficulty.

I don’t want to leave it just like that. I would like to add a few points.

First of all, the temperature was about 18C when I did this. It will progressively get more difficult because the plastic is less pliable as the temperature gets colder.

I should follow this up with the same experiment when the temperature is below freezing.

For my experiment I put extra screws into the channel simply to increase the chances of interference between wire insert and screws.

I had one instance where it was a little more tricky and had to push a little harder.

I could see that there could be a possibility where you might need to take out the wire insert and start 1 centimeter over.

There are a few things which I wish to point out on logistics and technique. There is a critical thing to remember for the helper who is pulling on the loose plastic.

He/she must be pulling at least 30 cm ahead of where the wire is going into the channel to allow the necessary slack to get the wire into the channel.

The same applies for the person inside the structure who is pulling on the end wall cover.

Inserting the wire insert is very much a wrist action and proper technique is probably even more important when doing 3 layers of 7.2 mil

Your thumb should be on the next equal bump (either up or down) so that you can apply some twisting action to the insert.

Never simply slide the insert up and down as this can abraid the cover.

I hope this helps

Norm